Monday, July 28, 2014

Recap #msMathChat 7/28/14

I attended my first #msmathchat today, though without a twitter handle, I was just "listening." It was a flood of ideas and resources, and the hour flew by! Today's focus was "getting our students to talk and justify their thoughts."

Here were the highlights for me:

@cmmteach described how she does a post-it debate
"Pose a question, ask for answers. All answers go on board. Students get post-it. Explain why they choose the answer they did. I collect and put into columns under answers while getting an idea of who said what. Then someone from each group has to try to convince others to switch answer to theirs. Kids can come change post it whenever. Then discuss what was it that made them change their mind. Then someone who changed explains concept again to those still need convincing."
I love this idea. Students persuading each other to change their minds (or not) is at the heart of MP3. And then the actual getting up and moving of the post-it provides a concrete action to go with the discussion. Even though I will have students primarily working in pairs (at least at the beginning of the year), I could pair pairs so that students would have a slightly larger group to discuss with. 

@MathButler has students work in groups to do error analysis of diagrams, equation solution processes, etc. He also recommended @lisabej_manitou's Always, Sometimes, Never Activity
 These are two activities that I already do a version of. However, I have never done them in a partner or group setting, and I absolutely think that the format for each of these activity would spark discussion.

@Kidsmathtalk offered up some critical thinking posters with questions and sentence stems
@Jreulbach has "smart" questions at each table for students to ask each other 
At some point this summer, I do want to figure out what sentence frames I will teach my students to support both partner and full group talk. These are some good ones to start with.
 
@Sarah3martin offered up her conversation rubric and recommended Promoting Purposeful Discourse

4
3
2
1
- One person talks at a time
- Everyone looking at the speaker
- Everyone listening
- Answering most questions
- Telling why we agree or disagree
 - Everyone shares ideas, thought, feelings

- One person talks at a time
- Everyone looking at the speaker
 - Everyone listening
- Answering most questions
- Telling why we agree or disagree
- Everyone shares ideas, thought, feelings

- A few people listening
- A few people looking at speaker - Few questions answered
- Only some agrees or disagrees
- A few people share

- Hardly anyone listening
- Hardly anyone looking at speaker - Not everyone involved in talk
- Questions left unanswered
- Hardly any sharing
Conversation stops

 As I am thinking about what I want group work to look like in my own classroom, this rubric also seems like a good place to start .

No comments:

Post a Comment